The Ghostfighters

May 12, 2010

Used by the Republic of Texas from 1836 to 1839

Filed under: Uncategorized — prowlland @ 12:09 am

Bonnie Blue Flag

 

  
The first recorded use of the lone star flag dates to 1810. On September 11, 1810 a troop of West Florida dragoons set out for the provincial capitol at Baton Rouge under this flag. They were joined by other republican forces and captured Baton Rouge, imprisoned the Governor and on September 23, 1810 raised their Bonnie Blue flag over the Fort of Baton Rouge. Three days later the president of the West Florida Convention, signed a Declaration of Independence and the flag became the emblem of a new republic. By December 10, the flag of the United States replaced the Bonnie Blue after President Madison issued a proclamation declaring West Florida under the jurisdiction of the Governor of the Louisiana Territory. With this rebellion in mind, this flag was used by the Republic of Texas from 1836 to 1839. On January 9, 1861 the convention of the People of Mississippi adopted an Ordinance of Secession. With this announcement the Bonnie Blue flag was raised over the capitol building in Jackson. Harry McCarthy was so inspired that he wrote a song entitled “The Bonnie Blue Flag” which became the second most popular patriotic song of the Confederacy. The Confederate government did not adopt this flag but the people did and the lone star flags were adopted in some form in five of the southern States that adopted new flags in 1861.   

Star symbolism of the Texas flag

In “The Lone Star Flag of Texas”, an article which appeared in the September 1948 issue of Frontier Times, author Adina de Zavala suggests a meaning for each point of the star. According to the article, the five points of the star represent the characteristics of a good citizen, which are fortitude, loyalty, righteousness, prudence, and broadmindedness.

 

 

 

Texas flag pledge of allegiance

The pledge of allegiance to Texas is:

“Honor the Texas flag;
I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas, one and indivisible.”

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